Pilot Radio Communication

This is a copy of our Pilot Communication manual- Please excuse any typo's or broken links

Radio Operation

 

AA 12 Audio Panel

ICS/Volume knob — Sets headset volume, usually about one third up from left

Vox/Squelch — Set too low = cutout, set too high=static, usually one third up from left

Transceiver selector knob — Selects Xmit and Receive radio, up to 3 comms.

Receiver selector knobs — Top row selects comm receive only through headset, bottom row selects

nav radios through headset. Can have one radio xmit/rec and other radios rec simultaneously.

Pilot ISO/Norm switch — Isolates pilot from passengers

TX light — Illuminates when a radio is transmitting.

 

King KY 97A— Comm only radio, 720 channel

  Off/on/volume knob — Turn right to turn on, increase volume. Pull out to set volume level. Frequency display active on left, standby on right.

  Arrow button -~ exchanges standby for active frequency

  Inner/outer frequency selector knobs — outer large knob tunes big numbers (XXX.000), outer small knob tunes

000.XX numbers, i.e. .85, .90, .95

  Pull small knob out to tune .OXX frequency, i.e. .925, .975

  “CHAN” button — Push to activate nine frequencies in memory storage. When “CHAN” pressed, frequency dials cycle through frequencies in memory.

 

Buttons on cyclic will also flip-flop frequencies and change memory freqs.

 

Transponder Operation

King KT76C Transponder — 4096 codes with altitude encoding altimeter (how do you know?) OFF/5TBY/TST/ON/ALT knob

  OFF — turns transponder off.

  STBY — Basically a warm-up position, on but not transmitting, not as important now that xponder is solid state.

  TST — Illuminates all display features to verify they all work and runs self diagnostic.

  ON Transponder is transmitting location without transmitting altitude info. Essentially no Mode C.

  ALT — Transponder transmitting location and altitude readout. This is normal operating position.

 

IDT button — This is the “ident” button. This “blossoms” your aircraft on controllers screen to make stand out. Only necessary to push and release.

 

VFR button -~ This will immediately change the code to 1200.

 

Code Entry Buttons - These are the 0,1 ,2,3 Used to input your assigned “squawk”. Normally set to VFR code of 1200. There are certain codes that you want to avoid (unless they are applicable):

        7700 — emergency

        7500—hijack

        7600— loss of comm.

 

CLR button — erases code entered one number at a time, starting from the right (allows corrections)

 

Left display window — displays altitude in hundreds of feet that is being sent by encoding altimeter to ATC, designated by “FL”

 

Right window display displays 4 digit code that you are “squawking” and what mode Xponder is in, i.e. “ALT” when altitude reporting

 

Other display — “R” lights when Xponder is replying to an interrogation.

 

 

 

ATC Pilot Glossary

 

More on AIM page 819

 

Abeam — An object or point app. 90 degrees to the right/left of aircraft track

Affirmative Yes

Altitude readout indicates — Used when ATC has an unconfirmed Mode C radar return.

Cleared for takeoff Cleared to land

Cleared for the option — Tower clears pilot to make t n g’s, full stop landing, low app, etc at pilot’s discretion.

Cleared into Class B airspace — You need to hear this BEFORE entering any Class B airspace.

Confirm — ATC wants you to confirm the question, such as “4SH, confirm 1,500”

Expedite — ATC wants you to do something as soon as possible, such as takeoff, clear the active runway, etc.

Go ahead — Normally used in communications, proceed with request.

Go around — Immediately discontinue landing approach and re-enter pattern.

Have traffic — Use when you see the aircraft traffic that ATC has alerted you to.

Heavy — Aircraft potentially over 255,000# GW. Significant because of wake turbulence.

Immediately — Do it right now!

Looking — Use when you don’t see aircraft ATC has alerted you to. Maintain — As in maintain runway heading, maintain a certain altitude, etc. Negative No

Negative contact — Same as “looking”, probably more correct if you really want to be conformist.

Radar contact — ATC has positively identified you on radar.

Radar service terminated — Used by ATC when leaving their airspace or if controller gets too busy. Readback correct — ATC confirming you have correctly understood their instructions, usually for clearances. Report — ATC wants you to let them know when you are at a certain point, i.e. “Report left downwind, 28”.

Resume own navigation — Usually used when you had been given radar vectors around traffic or to a location.

Roger- Last transmission was understood.  Often overused.

Runway heading — Used with “maintain” usually in Class C or B to initially get you away from airport.

Say again, please — Never be afraid or embarrassed to say this!

Say altitude — In thousands and hundreds of feet, i.e. 1,500 “45H, level one thousand five hundred”.

Say heading — Use magnetic heading from compass or directional gyro.

Squawk XXXX— The 4 digit code that you input into the transponder. “Squawk VFR” 1200.

Standby — Wait until ATC gets back to you, usually used when they are very busy.

Taxi into position and hold — Cleared to taxi/hover onto the runway but NOT cleared to takeoff.

Traffic in sight — You reporting seeing an aircraft that ATC has alerted you to.

 

Traffic no longer a factor — You can stop looking for the traffic.

Unable — Cannot comply with ATC request, i.e. “4SH, can you give me 150 knots on final?”

Verify — Essentially interchangeable with confirm.

Wilco – Will comply.  You are going to comply with the instructions just given.

 

Terms not to use

No Joy

 

ATC & Radio Procedures

 

Will learn to hate or love ATC, but you are going to have to deal with, so better develop skills.

Setup while warming up. Know the frequencies that you are going to use and setup accordingly. You may be tempted to use both radios, but not rec for awhile. Use GPS for listening only, like ATIS or AWOS or even 123.02. You want to have the mike very close to your lips, this reduces wind and other noises (don’t need to lick)

English is language of aviation worldwide. You are in the system, just like a 747 so conform! Not the place to display individuality.

Phonetic alphabet and nine — to avoid confusion

Can just use “Helicopter such & such”. Fixed wing will use Cherokee, Bonanza, etc. ATC may ask; “554SH is a Robinson R22” is sufficient.

Plan what you are going to say, think it through. This will help eliminate the “uhuhuhuhuh’s” and that is good. Try to be economical. For example, don’t need to use “Control” with ground or approach/departure. It also helps if you can anticipate what ATC is going to say.

Listen before you talk —in both uncontrolled and controlled environment. Most important with controller from embarrassment point. You may hear only one side of conversation, especially with center or app.

Most transmissions are a combination of; Who you are talking to (only on initial contact), who you are (ALWAYS), where you are (what altitude with center and app) and what you want. Tell where you are when taking off.

N# is for USA aircraft — no need to state unless going to Mexico, Canada, etc

Use entire N# until ATC shortens it first, could be A/C with same last three numbers/letters (554SH & 654SH) or could even sound the same.

In uncontrolled airport, state full intentions around traffic pattern. However, with center, app or tower, you may want to just call up without giving spiel and let controller get back to you. lf= real busy, not busy at all or you have a real long request that you don’t want to repeat. Discretion. Do not ask over and over if getting no response, go back to previous frequency and check to see if radios are set up OK. Frequency when changing controller is in standby, can go back to it if no answer.

Talk at reasonable speed and don’t be afraid request information over (say again). Go ahead and tell that you are a student pilot. If ATC tells you to report over some landmark and you don’t know, tell that you are unfamiliar with area. Same thing about airport, ask where transient parking is, ask which taxiways if don’t know or get lost. You don’t have copilot to read map.

Class B & C departure — Call before you are in hover so can write clearance info down

Need to repeat “to do” information like where to report, cleared for takeoff, cleared for landing, etc. Not necessary for info call like wind speed, in radar contact, clear of traffic, etc —just acknowledge with call sign.

When approaching C or B, get ATIS beforehand and let approach know. Also let tower know when you switch over or they will probably ask.

Reporting altitudes — when changing controllers (app) just say: “Helicopter 554SH level 1,500”. Always use thousand then hundred, so no fifteen hundred. If not level, always report altitude climbing/descending through and target altitude.

Not only listen before talking, but listen for your aircraft call sign. Use Iso switch if necessary, and be prepared to silence (politely but firmly) if you need to talk. Also, don’t be afraid to report your position just because an instructor is talking to you; DPE will be looking for that.

Tower will sometimes tell you to “Contact ground .9” Always 121 .x

Helicopters can arrive/depart direct to many destinations on airport. For example, if you are at the helipad at Modesto airport and are departing, you could call up the tower and request a present position departure.

Coolness factor - do not respond to ATC without using N number. Do not respond by just clicking mike. No “roger that”, “OK’s”, etc.

Whatever you do, DO NOT SACRIFICE CONTROL OF AIRCRAFT TO TALK ON RADIO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

So now, let’s compare two radio calls;

 

“Modesto Control Tower, this is helicopter November 554SH. I am a Robinson Model R22 Beta II. I am ten nautical miles west-northwest of Modesto City-County airport and my altitude is 1500’ MSL. I would like to land at Modesto airport and I have the current ATIS information Delta.

Please respond with landing instructions. Over.” 56 Or the same thing could have been said;

“Modesto tower, helicopter 554SH, ten west, landing with Delta”. 9

 

ATC Situations

CENTER

When to contact — On a long trip when you are flying above 6000’ and you would like VFR flight following.

 

What to say — Assume you are on a trip from Los Banos to Palm Springs. You have taken off and have climbed to 7,500’ and are over Firebaugh.

“Oakland Center, helicopter 7532D over Firebaugh level 7,500 for Palm Springs, request VFR flight following.”

 

 

APPROACH/DEPARTURE

 

When to contact — 20-40 miles out from destination or anywhere if you would like to request VFR traffic advisories.

 

What to say:

1.                    You are approaching Class B or C airspace and landing at the primary airport; “Fresno Approach, helicopter 7532D, 20 west @ 1,500 for landing with Delta”

 

2.                    You would like VFR traffic advisories;

“Norcal approach, helicopter 7532D over Madera for Modesto @1,500. Request flight following”.

 

3.                    You are receiving VFR traffic advisories and are being handed off to a new sector; “Norcal approach, helicopter 7532D level 1,500”.

 

TOWER

 

When to contact - When you are approaching a Class D airport, are being handed off by approach control at a Class B or C airport and when you are ready for takeoff. What to say:

1.                    You are ten miles to the west of Salinas;

“Salinas tower, helicopter 2312J, ten north landing with Delta”

 

2.                    Salinas approach is handing you off to Salinas tower; “Salinas tower, helicopter 2312J inbound with Delta”

 

3.                    You are at SNS, ready to takeoff from 26 and you want to make a right turn departure for WVI; “Salinas tower, helicopter 2312J ready for takeoff 26, request right hand departure to Watsonville”

 

GROUND

 

When to contact —When arriving and clearing the active runway, when at parking and desiring to taxi/hover to a runway for takeoff or you are getting your “mini” clearance at a Class C airport.

 

What to say

1.                    You have just landed at Modesto on 28L, hovered clear at taxiway Bravo and the tower has told you to contact ground. You wish to go to transient parking;

“Modesto ground, helicopter 7532D, clear 28L at Bravo for transient parking”

 

2.                    You are at Modesto transient parking and want to go to the active runway; “Modesto ground, helicopter 7532D transient parking for taxi with Bravo”.

 

3.                    You are at the helipad at Sacramento International airport and are returning to Los Banos ~

2,500’

“Sacramento ground, helicopter 7532D, helipad with Charlie, VFR to Los Banos ~ 2,500’, request present position departure”.

 

 

CLEARANCE DELIVERY

 

When to contact — When departing VFR from a Class B airport or at a Class C airport when so advised by ATIS.

What to say - You are at Signature Flight Support at SF0 and wish to depart from your present position VFR for Los Banos ~ 2,500,’

“San Francisco Clearance Delivery, helicopter 7532D, Signature with Delta, VFR to Watsonville @ 2,500’,

request present position departure”.

 

Class C Airspace Scenario

 

You are twenty-five miles north of SNS @ 1,500, information Juliet is current. You want to land at the helipad and stay for about an hour.

 

ARRIVAL

                                   NorCal approach, helicopter 694DC. Helicopter 694DC, NorCal approach, go ahead.

                                   Helicopter 694DC is 20 miles north @ 1,500, landing with Juliet. Helicopter 4DC, squawk 4217.

                                   4DC,squawk42l7.

 

Helicopter 4DC, radar contact 20 miles north @ 1,500.

 

                                   4DC.

 

4DC, traffic 3 o’clock, 2 miles, altitude readout indicates 2,200.

                                   4DC, looking. OR

                                   4DC has traffic.

Helicopter 4DC, where would you like to go on the airport?

                                   4DC would like the helipad.

4DC, traffic 12 o’clock, 4 miles, is a United Express Metroliner climbing through 1,100 for 8,000.

 

                                   4DC has the Metroliner. 4DC, what type helicopter are you?

                                   4DC, Robinson R22 4SH, traffic no longer a factor.

          4DC.

4DC, contact tower 119.4

 

THEN:

 

     Tower 119.4.

 

                                   Salinas tower, helicopter 694DC inbound @ 1,500 with Juliet.

 

Helicopter 694DC, wind 320 © 10, altimeter 29.98. Confirm you’d like to go to the Helipad?

 

4DC, cleared to land on the Helipad, traffic on short final 31 is a National Guard F16, wind 310 @ 09.

 

                                   4DC, cleared to land Helipad, have the F16.

 

DEPARTURE

 

You are departing for Los Banos @ 1,500. You would like to depart directly from your present position at the big H. Current ATIS is Kilo.

 

         Fresno ground, helicopter 694DC adjacent big H with Kilo, VFR to Los Banos @ 1,500, request present position departure.

 

Helicopter 694DC, Fresno ground, after takeoff maintain VFR at or below 2,000 on course for Los Banos, squawk 3514, Fresno departure on 119.6.

 

THEN:

 

 

           Helicopter 694DC, maintain VFR at or below 2,000 on course for Los Banos, squawk 3514, departure 119.6.

 

           Fresno tower, helicopter 694DC ready for takeoff, big H.

 

Helicopter 694DC, Fresno tower, cleared for takeoff from present position, avoid overflying parked aircraft. Caution, wake turbulence from departing UPS 757.

           694DC cleared for takeoff present position, avoid overflying parked aircraft.

 

 

4DC, contact departure. Have a good flight.

 

 

THEN:

 

              4DC, contact departure. Thanks.

 

 

           Fresno departure, helicopter 694DC climbing through 1,300 for 1,500. Helicopter 5545H, Fresno departure, radar contact 3 miles west of the airport @ 1,300’.

      694DC.

Helicopter 694DC, traffic 10 o’clock, 1 mile, altitude readout indicates 900’, appears to be maneuvering.

 

           4DC, looking. 4DC, traffic no longer a factor.

           4DC.

4DC, leaving my airspace to the west, radar service terminated, squawk VFR, frequency change approved. Good day.

            4DC, squawk VFR, frequency change approved. Good day.

 

Salinas Valley Airport

 

 

RADIO ARRIVAL PROCEDURES

 

PRIOR TO CONTACTING SALINAS TOWER GET ATIS ON 124.85

 

PRIOR TO ENTERING SALINAS CLASS D, CONTACT TOWER ON 119.4 (7-10 MILES OUT)

 

PILOT “SALINAS TOWER CESSNA SIX FIVE SIX FIVE JULIET TEN MILES SOUTHEAST INBOUND FOR LANDING WITH (INFORMATION) XRAY”

OR

“SALINAS TOWER. CESSNA SIX FIVE SIX FIVE JULIET, TEN MILES SOUTHEAST.INBOUND FOR PATTERN WORK WITH (INFORMATION) XRAY”

 

TOWER “CESSNA SIX FIVE SIX FIVE JULIET, MAKE STRAIGHT IN RUNWAY THREE ONE, REPORT     TWO MILES”

 

PILOT “SIX FIVE JULIET STRAIGHT IN RUNWAY THREE ONE, REPORT TWO MILES”

 

AT TWO MILES

PILOT “SALINAS TOWER, SIX FIVE JULIET TWO MILES’~

 

EXPECT

TOWER “CESSNA SIX FIVE SIX FIVE JULIET, CLEARED TO LAND RUNWAY THREE ONE”

 

PILOT “SIX FIVE JULIET. CLEARED TO LAND, RUNWAY THREE ONE

OR

TOWER “CESSNA SIX FIVE SIX FIVE JULIET, CLEARED FOR THE OPTION, RUNWAY THREE ONE”

 

PILOT “CESSNA SIX FIVE JULIET. CLEARED FOR THE  OPTION, RUNWAY THREE ONE”

 

RADIO DEPARTURE PROCEDURES

 

AFTER ENGINE START CONTACT ATIS ON 124.85

 

AFTER TAXI CHECKLIST. CONTACT GROUND ON 121.7

 

PILOT “SALINAS GROUND, CESSNA SIX FIVE SIX FIVE JULIET AT AIR TRAILS. READY TO TAXI WITH ALPHA”

 

GROUND “CESSNA SIX FIVE SIX FIVE JULIET, TAXI TO RUNWAY THREE ONE”

 

PILOT “SIX FIVE JULIET TAXI TO RUNWAY THREE ONE”

 

AFTER TAXI AND RUN UP, TAXI UP TO AND HOLD SHORT OF THE HOLD SHORT LINE, CONTACT TOWER ON 119.4

 

PILOT “SALINAS TOWER CESSNA SIX FIVE SIX FIVE JULIET. READY FOR TAKE OFF RUNWAY THREE ONE. DOWNWIND DEPARTURE”

 

TOWER “CESSNA SIX FIVE SIX FIVE JULIET HOLD SHORT” (LANDlNG AIRCRAFT)

TAXI INTO POSITION AND HOLD” (AIRCRAFT ON RUNWAY) CLEARED FOR TAKEOFF, RIGHT DOWNWIND DEPARTURE APPROVED”

NOTE: TRAFFIC MAY CAUSE TOWER TO USE A LEFT DOWNWIND DEPARTURE

 

PILOT “SIX FIVE JULIET. CLEARED FOR TAKEOFF. RIGHT DOWNWIND DEPARTURE”

 

OTHER DEPARTURES

Monterey

Departing Monterey (any runway in use) Watsonville

From rnwy 31 request “straight out departure” From rnwy 26 request “right 45 departure”

Hollister

From rnwy 26 or 31 request “departing Hollister”

 

 

Flying from Salinas (KSNS) to Monterey (KMRY)

 

Typical Best Case Scenario-Expect Minor and Major Variations

 

Frequencies KMRY

Atis 119.25

Norcal Approach 133.0 (127.15)* Monterey Tower 118.4

Monterey Ground 121.9

 

1.        Tell Salinas Tower at departure Salinas Tower, Cessna 6565 Juliet, ready for takeoff, departing to Monterey”… this will normally provide you with a quick frequency change, normally as you cross the Freeway… if you don’t hear from the tower by the time you cross the freeway, ASK for a frequency change.

2.        Have Monterey Atis set on one of your radios with the Com panel Com switch on both, ATIS volume turned down so you can just hear it without blocking out the Tower or Norcal Approach. With the frequency change approval, switch from Salinas Tower to Norcal Approach.

3.        The following call to Norcal Approach is a departure from obtaining flight following for a cross country or the Salinas Valley practice area… “Norcal Approach Cessna 6565 Juliet departing Salinas, Landing Monterey”

4.        Expect “Cessna 6565 Juliet, Squawk. 0325, make straight in runway 28 (Left/ Right) say” NOTE: expect the unexpected when dealing with Norcal Approach. Do NOT ENTER Monterey Airspace if they do not acknowledge you with your tail number. For instance if they say “Aircraft calling from Salinas say again” you are NOT cleared to enter Monterey airspace. If they say 6565 Juliet, standby” you are cleared to enter their airspace (although I recommend circling at Highway 68 and the Salinas River until Radar Contact is established. Also, 2000 feet is plenty of altitude for the trip, 1500 will do if you follow Highway 69 until aligned with the extended runway centerline), If the wind favors Runways 10 L/R you can expect “Cessna 6565 Juliet, Squawk. 0325, make left traffic for runway 10 Left”

5.        Repeat the clearance “65Juliet squawk 0325, straight in runway 28 (Left/Right)

6.        Approach will then come back with “65 Juliet, radar contact, say altitude”

7.        Respond with “65 Juliet climbing through 800 for 2000”,

8.        Expect a handoff to Monterey Tower... “6 5 Juliet, contact tower, 118.4”.

9.        Do NOT change frequency without acknowledging the handoff.. “65 Juliet contact tower 118.4”

10.     Contact tower .Monterey tower, 6565 Juliet with you”

11.     Tower knows your location and will instruct you ‘65 Juliet cleared too land runway Note: if cleared to land 28 right, you may request 28 left, and providing there is no incoming traffic on the parallel runway, you will usually get your request.

12.     After landing promptly taxi clear of the runway, and unless otherwise instructed by tower, contact Ground,

121.9 and announce… “Monterey Ground, Cessna 6565 Juliet, clear of runway going to  _”  or “taxiing back for takeoff to Salinas” (or other destination).

 

*     127.15 normally reserved for off the shoreline (see sectional), but often there is only one controller who can be on either 133.0 or 127.15.

 

NOTE:  Normal Departure instructions to Salinas from runways 10 from Ground are.., “Cessna 6565 Juliet after

 

takeoff fly runway heading to 900 feet then left turn to 060 degrees, departure frequency 133.0, squawk. 0436” similarly from the 28 runways except... “climb on runway heading until past the freeway, then right turn to 060.”

 

 

REID-HILLVIEW AIRPORT

 

Downwind Departure From Reid-Hillview Airport

 

1.        Contact Atis. Write down altimeter setting, wind direction and speed, atis code.

2.        Initial callup to ground from tie down: (Southbound departure, runway 31 in use, Atis code for these examples

= Romeo).

Pilot: “Reid-Hillview ground, Cessna (call sign) at transient parking, ready to taxi with Romeo, downwind departure.”

Ground: “Cessna (call sign), taxi to 31 right via Zulu”

-or-

Ground: “Cessna (call sign), taxi to 31 right via inner ramp to hotel then Zulu.”

Pilot:  Repeat ground instructions

 

3.        Callup to tower at hold short line, after taxi from runup area:

Pilot: “Reid-Hillview tower, Cessna (call sign) ready for takeoff, 31 right”

Tower: “(call sign) hold short” (landing aircraft)

“(call sign) taxi into position and hold” (aircraft on runway)

“(call sign) cleared for departure, 31 right, downwind departure.”

“(call sign) taxi across 31 right, cleared fro takeoff runway 31 left, left downwind departure approved

“(call sign) cross 31 right to 31 left, taxi into position and hold.” (aircraft on runway) – to be followed by: “(call sign) cleared for takeoff runway 31 left, downwind departure approved.” “(call sign) taxi into position and hold.” (aircraft on runway) – to be followed by:

“(call sign) cleared for takeoff.” Repeat tower instructions.

 

 

Landing at Reid-Hillview Airport from Southeast

 

1.        Get atis code at 2500 ft. or greater. (At or before Anderson Reservoir). Atis will advise wind, altimeter, runways in use, and to contact tower on 119.8 or if busy and occasionally on weekends 126.1. If 126.1 is in use, plan on a straight in approach to 31L or right downwind for 13R

2.        At UTC:

Pilot: “Reid-Hillview tower, Cessna (call sign) at UTC, descending through 3500 ft, inbound for landing with Romeo.”

Tower: “(call sign) (optional: wind 330 at 12) fly straight in for runway 31 left (or 31 right), report 2 (or

3) miles.”

Pilot: Repeat Tower instructions.

3.        At 2 (or 3) mile mark:

Pilot: “Reid-Hillview tower, (call sign) 2 (or 3) miles.

Tower: “(Call sign) cleared for landing, runway 31 left (31 right).”

4.        After landing:

(Note: move quickly to leave runway at nearest exit without hard brake use, taxi clear of old short line and contact ground after coming to a full stop. Before proceeding, apply “After Landing” checklist). While on rollout on the active runway, tower may say to taxi to parking after landing.

 

Tower:  (While rolling to a stop on 31 right) “(call sign) turn off runway at exit Delta (or other) and contact

 

ground at point 65’

 

(From 31 left While rolling to a stop) “(call sign) cross 31 right at exit Delta (or other) and

 

 

Non-Tower Airports

 

Making self-announced reports when operating at non-tower airports

 

 

Pilot: “Watsonville traffic, Helicopter (call sign) five miles out (direction), at 1200 ft.(or other altitude) Inbound for landing, runway 20, Watsonville”

 

Pilot: “Watsonville traffic, Helicopter (call sign) at the river and the freeway (or direction) for a left forty five downwind entry, 20, Watsonville”

 

Pilot: “Watsonville traffic, Helicopter (call sign) taking off parallel taxiway 20 (taxiway alpha) left closed pattern, Watsonville”

 

Pilot:  “Watsonville traffic, Helicopter (call sign) turning left crosswind, 20, Watsonville”

 

Pilot:  “Watsonville traffic, Helicopter (call sign) entering left downwind, 20, Watsonville”

 

Pilot:  “Watsonville traffic, Helicopter (call sign) turning left base, parallel taxiway 20, Watsonville”

 

Pilot:  “Watsonville traffic, Helicopter (call sign) on final, parallel taxiway 20, Watsonville”

- if you land on runway 16 and have cleared runway 16.

 

Pilot:  “Watsonville Traffic, Helicopter (call sign) clear runway 20.”

 

 

Things to Keep in Mind When Reporting

 

            Use common sense when making reports

 

            Observe the amount of traffic in the pattern

 

            Consider making fewer radio calls if there is no one around to avoid cluttering the UNICOM frequency

 

Favorite Aviation Internet Addresses

 

 AOPA

ASF

www.aopa.org/asf

www.aopa.org/asf/taxi

Taxi Diagrams

 

www.aopa.org/asf/runway_safety/

Interactive runway safety course

 

 

EAA

Flying Start (EAA learn to fly)

 

www.eaa.org www.eaa.org/chopters/flyinq_start.html

www.aopa.org

 

 

WEATHER

AOPA Weather Brief (members only)

www.aopa.org

Briefing from DUATS

EAA Weather Brief (Members only)

Flight planning and legal weather briefing ~

 

www.duat.com

members.eaa.org/home/flightbrief www.enflight.com

Goes Imagery and Satellite Tutorials:

Naval Research Laboratory Colorado State University

www.nrlmry.navy.mil/sat products.html

National Weather Service Weather website

Nexrad:

www.cira.colostate.edu/ramm/advimgry/toc

www.nws.noaa.gov adds.awc–kc.noaa. gov/

The Weather Channel

-Intellicast

www.weather.com

ASOS/AWOS

Real time weather

Prides itself on being most complete

www.intellicast.com/weather/usa/others

www.faa.gov/asos/asos.html www.rap.ucar.edu/weather/index.html www.aviationweather.com/

INSTRUMENT FLYING

 

Airport approach plates

 

www.aeroplanner.com/flightplanning/

 

approachplates.cfm

Jep IFR clinic reviews

www.jeppesen.com/onlinepubs/aopa.phtml

Articles from IFR Refresher magazine

 

www.terps.com/ifrr/

FAA

 

www.faa.gov

Home Page

Civil Aeromedical Institute (CAMI)

 

www.comi.jccbi.gov

FSDO Offices

FAA Forms, pilot/maint. Schools/#’s

 

faa-gov/avr/afs/fsdo/fsdornaphome.htm

Library and FARs AIM

 

www.av-info.faa.gov

faa.gov/avr/af

 

faa.gov/atpubs/aim/index.htm

Advisory Circ. Chkist

 

www.faa.gov/aba/htmI_policies/

files_pdf/ac_ckist-all.pdf

 

Judgment Training Manual

 

www-cyberair.com/tower/faa/index.html

GPS

 

www.gps.faa.gov

FAA Accident database

nasdac.faa.gov/main. htm

Flight data (FAR access, N Registry)

 

www.flightdata.com

Changing CFI#’s & Forms

 

registry.faa.gov

 

Miscellaneous

 

 

Links for CFIs, including AIM

 

www.TheCfi com

GA Pilot Info

 

www.dot.state.tx.us “AVIATION”, then

 

bottom of page GA PILOT INFO-Info for VFR, IFR and huge list of Web sites

Many web sites                                                                          www.landings.com

Trip ideas                                                                                    www.100dollarhamburger.com

Rod Machado                                                                             www.rodmachado.com

Aviation Speakers                                                                     www.aviationspeakers.com

Learn to fly and marketing for CFIs                                       www.beapilot.com 1-888-232-7456

Flying Start (EAA learn to fly)                                                  www.flyinqstart.org

Source for students/instructors                                               www.whittsflying. corn

Air foil simulator FM                                                                  www.lerc.nasa.gov/WWW/K-12/aerosim

Flight planning for Cheapest gas                                           www.airnav.com

Women in Aviation, International                                           www-wiai.com

Airport Remote Radio Access System                                   www.arinc.com/

AVWeb-Aviation News Service                                               www.avweb.com

General Aviation Manufactures                                              www.qeneralaviation.org

National Air & Space Museum                                                www.nasm.edu

Nat’l. Trans. Safety Board                                                        www.ntsb-gov

USAF Museum                                                                          www.wpafb.af.mil

Aero Planner for charts                                                            www.aeroplanner.com

Noise reduction headset for $44.90 total                              www.avshop.com/560208001.html Thunderstorm internet class                                                                              www.nwas.org/committees/avnwxcourse

/course.htm

Runway Safety Web site                                                          runwaysafety.foa.gov

Decision Making                                                                        flysafe.faa.qov/Flysafe/home.htm

Ben Hinkle’s BLM TFR                                                             airspace.blm.gov/ av-info.faa.gov/data/640otherfaqlpt61-18.doc